A key component of Groupon’s business model is the use of “creative copy” in their offers. They employ a staff of creative writers whose purpose is not simply to inform readers of the offer, but entertain them. They believe this establishes brand personality and separates them from the myriad other offers out there.

But when, exactly, does clever twists of words actually hinder the reader’s effort to discern the interest and value? Groupon’s return rate and other usage numbers are not stellar. Perhaps one reason is that they have misplaced where they are in the communication spectrum.   

Coupons that work best are focused on value, not creating some derivative of brand experience. Clever copy can get in the way, especially when you have me click through to the moment of truth. The deal is promoted as $X, with a value of $Y. A click-through logically suggests an answer to the value equation of Y – X. When verbose and garrulous explanations follow, it becomes tedious for the reader.

The art of good copy, especially in the Twitter world of today, is short, to the point and plain-speaking.

After all, you have them at the cash register. What is the saying? Make the sale and shut up!

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