Yes Super Bowl is about the football, if you know anything about our office you know we love football. But it is also all about the ads and we love to talk about them. Wasn’t it your water cooler chatter today? It certainly was ours and we asked our team to weigh in on their favorites. Here is what they had to say:

Mike Tyre, Managing Partner:  The Chrysler ad

“One ad stood out.  It was totally about today.  Truthfully with just a little editing, viewers might have considered it a part of the programming.  The commercial was Chrysler.  It is getting widely praised as the “best of” for this Super Bowl.  Three reasons why.  First, in a sea of ads trying to be humor, be clever or tell you how smart or great they are, Chrysler talked about you … or the American people.  It reflected the angst and the polarization in this country’s political climate.  And, it offered a solution … “Americans get behind Detroit.”  Made you feel it.  Great casting.  As a contrast, GE ran a couple of ads.  They were frankly boring.  Why?  They are talking about what they are doing and their people.  Employees and stockholders maybe will like it, but nothing on the emotive meter.  Secondly, terrific positioning.  A great play of media placement and messaging.   Third, people look to brands that can aspire something greater.  In a game that represents the culmination of dreams for players, Chrysler connected their brand.  Not to buying sheet metal, but to being a part of “rekindling” the American Dream.  How can you not jump on that train?  Did it sell cars?  I know this.  A lot of people who wouldn’t have considered Chrysler at all are at least thinking about them now.  Chrysler at least got into the consideration stage for a lot of viewers.  That makes their commercial the MVP of Super Bowl ads.”

Bob Richardson, Copywriter: The Audi Vampires Ad

“An unusual scenario for top tier car brand. This spot uses a pop cult vampire spin to sell the product’s incomparable feature — the Audi brand’s ultra-powerful headlights. They shine on a group of vampires at night, like daylight, making vampires disappear. Even the vampire driver, amused and passing in front of the Audi’s headlights, vanishes in light of Audi’s mystical product feature. The joke IS the product — not detached — therefore effective.”

Jan Sharrow, Designer:  The Budweiser Eternal Optimism ad

“The nostalgic time line of the Budweiser – 2012 – Eternal Optimism ad. Budweiser has been around for many years and this ad illustrates how the brand has been a part of our history. It’s fun to watch snapshots of years gone by in a positive party setting. There are scenes from history from times before I was born until now. It gets more emotional to see times in history that I lived through such as the scene from the 1980’s. Make me want to party.”

April Voris, Partner:  The Honda Ferris Bueller ad

“My pick is the Honda commercial with Mathew Brodrick. It tapped into a nostalgia that anyone in a certain target age will relate, and this happens to be a target for the CRV. Even the last detail of the valet was brilliant.”

Amanda Kirkland, Producer:  The Kia ad

“I was born and raised in Alabama. Which means one thing for sure: I have no allegiance when it comes to NFL. So each year when the Super Bowl rolls around, the commercials are the highlight of my night.  My favorite commercial of the evening was the Kia spot. Which really surprised me. It opened up with a very creppy minion sneaking around people’s bedrooms, sprinkling pixie dust. I didn’t like it at all. Until the overdose of pixie dust resulted in the ultimate man-dream.  Between the macho man riding a bucking rhino and a monstrous sandwich being sawed in half by lumberjacks, I was in stitches. But my favorite part? When our hero rescued his leading lady – his wife – with the message that a Kia is a normal car for normal people. Good job, Kia.”

Charissa Schultz, Designer:  The Budweiser Weego ad

“I loved the Budweiser commercial with the dog named “Weego.” Besides the fact that I love ads with pets in them, It was entertaining to the very end, yet you never lost sight of the product in all the shenanigans with the dog. After carrying bottles to all the individual guests, Wego brought in a keg when he saw the crowd joining the party. And at the end, he came floating by in the pool with yet another cold Bud.  Even with all the going’s on, this ad subtly showed:  1. You can enjoy the product not only in bottles, but also by the keg.  2. It was a good refreshment for when you have a couple of friends over, or when you have a crowd.  3. People enjoy the product both inside and outdoors.  But the best reason to love this ad is that the owner stated at the very beginning that Weego was a “rescue dog.” That was an excellent ( and subtle – using only two words) way to show that the company cared about animal rights and supported finding homes for homeless pets.  And that earned this commercial a five-star rating from me!!”

Ashley Schoenith, Director of Social Media & Engagement:  Beyond TV

“Beyond the TV, I was impressed by some of the creative ways in which marketers capitalized on social for this year’s Superbowl – and Twitter lead the way. Chevy shines again through their sponsorship of trending topic #Superbowl. The folks at Shazam should be giving themselves a pat on the back too – I think I counted 6 different commercials that plugged them in some way. American Express and Pizza Hut partnering for a Super Swarm Sunday promotion on FourSquare – also a nice touch. A few Facebook Ad buys from Toyota and The Voice seem to have garnered some interest, allowing us to engage back with the brand. The only thing missing for me? Pinterest of course. Maybe next year…”

Advertisements